pronouns: she, her, hers

In 2015, Sarah moved to unceded Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh territory to join the YouthCO team. Sarah is enthusiastic about quality time, bike rides, rereading favourite books, and making and sharing great food. Sarah is asexual (as in queer), and has always been curious about why so many of us are reluctant to talk openly about sex. Sarah is a white settler, and has been part of HIV and Hep C education, policy making, research, and programming in Iqaluit, Guelph, and now Vancouver.

Sarah Chown's activity stream

  • Financial Support for Youth Living with HIV and/or Hep C

    Answer

    https://www.youthco.org/financialsupports

  • published Dance It Out in Events 2020-11-04 11:57:17 -0800

    Dance It Out

    This event is FREE and open to youth living with HIV and/or Hep C from 16 to 29 years old. 
     

    We all could use a little fun these days! Join us on November 26 for our online Dance it Out event. Dance it Out is an evening to have fun, connect and learn a short dance routine led by Annabelle! Whatever our level of dance experience, this event will be a chance to enjoy some music and move our bodies. All participants will be provided with a gift card for a meal, and entered into a draw for a $50 gift card of our choice.

    How do I join? 

    To participate in this event, please get in touch with Jessica (she, her, hers) by email at jessica@youthco.org, give us a call (604-688-1441, or 1-855-968-8426), or connect with us on social media! We will follow up and share a quick introduction to our program, and all the details to join the event!

    We will be hosting this event online, using our virtual meeting platform - Zoom. To participate, we will need access to a device connected to the internet with display, sound and mic capabilities like a laptop, desktop with headphones, or a smartphone. The Zoom app is free, and can be downloaded to a phone, computer, or tablet! We can make an account for free or join without an account. 

    Is this event accessible for me? 

    Contact jessica@youthco.org for any questions or access needs we haven't mentioned here, or to make arrangements to borrow a laptop! 

    • We do not need to disclose our HIV or Hep C status to the group to participate. 
    • YouthCO is able to support youth living with HIV and/or Hep C in accessing previously used devices (such as a laptop) and/or data plans to support participation. 
    • Do you have an access need we haven't mentioned? Let us know! 
    When
    November 26, 2020 at 6pm
    Where
    Zoom
  • published Beading in Events 2020-10-27 09:13:07 -0700

    Beading Earrings

    Culture is Healing is back, and now taking place online!

    We invite you to join us for our online beading workshop with Nona, one of our staff members, from Mediocre Beaders. You can check out their work on Instagram @mediocrebeaders. New beaders and experienced beaders are welcome!

    Mediocre Beaders specializes with fringe earrings, which we will be making at this workshop. Nona will be showing us a pattern and going over the steps with us. Come and hang out we would love to see you! Whether this is your first time beading, or you have been beading for awhile, join us for community, culture, and beading. We will be getting started at 6pm, are you are welcome to stay for as long or as short as you would like!

    We will be providing and mailing beading supplies to 20 Indigenous youth participants in BC who confirm their spot and mailing address by November 20, whether by RSVPing below, connecting with us on social media, or calling or emailing.

    This event will be hosted by two Indigenous youth facilitators, including Nona from Mediocre Beaders (@mediocrebeaders), and we have an Elder who will be joining us as well.

    Culture is Healing is a monthly event for and by Indigenous youth. During these events, we come together to share cultural teachings and knowledge, and provide a safer space where we can have discussions on topics such as holistic well-being, harm reduction, sexuality, sexual health, HIV, and Hep C. This is a gender affirming space. We welcome Indigenous youth with all identities to share our space for Culture is Healing.

    ACCESSIBILITY:

    This is a free event for Indigenous youth between the ages of 14 - 29!

    Yúusnewas will mail supplies, including thread, two needles, mini beading mat, earring findings, and 10/0 beads in four colours to participants who confirm their spot in advance.
    Some items that would be helpful to have that we cannot provide in the kits is: Scissors, a lighter, and small jewelry pliers. If you cannot access pliers, other items like the scissors can work. 
    The event will be held over Zoom, an online video meeting platform. Participants will need access to a device with a screen, sound, mic and internet capabilities like a smartphone, tablet, laptop or desktop to participate. Zoom links will be sent to all participants who let us know you are coming, whether by RSVPing below, or connecting with us on social media.

    If you have any questions regarding the event, or if there are ways we can make this event accessible for you please contact Amanda via email at amanda@youthco.org.

    When
    December 09, 2020 at 6pm
    20 rsvps
  • published Matriarch Rising in Our Voices 2020-10-09 12:01:09 -0700

    Matriarch Rising

    Answer

    https://youthco.org/fdmatriarchrising

  • published Hep C & We in Resources 2020-07-31 12:03:33 -0700

    Hep C & We

    Answer

    http://www.youthco.org/hepc

  • published Undetectable = Untransmittable in Resources 2020-07-26 12:35:59 -0700
  • published Inclusive & Destigmatizing Language in Our Voices 2020-07-11 15:55:24 -0700

    Inclusive & Destigmatizing Language

    Inclusive language is one of the ways we approach providing relatable and relevant information to our peers. Using inclusive language is a way we put our values – including sex-positivity, anti-oppression, and inclusiveness – into action. Being excluded from the information that is provided to us impacts our health, our ability to make informed choices, and the ways we access information and support.

    These guidelines are far from exhaustive: there are many, many words used within HIV, Hep C, sexual health, and harm reduction that reflect stigma, fear, and misinformation. We welcome feedback, suggestions, and additions anytime! YouthCO is also able to facilitate workshops to provide more information as to the ways this language can be stigmatizing, and relevant alternatives for specific settings!

    Teachings from the Native Youth Sexual Health Network have influenced this resource! This amazing organization invites us to consider ways to use supportive language as an alternative to stigmatizing language.   


    Avoid using language that is stigmatizing! Instead, try neutral or supportive alternatives! See our examples.

    Don't use

    Do use

    Don't use

    Infect or spread
    ex. Youth can be infected through sex

    Do use

    Pass
    ex. HIV can be passed through unprotected vaginal, anal, or frontal sex

    Don't use

    Infected with HIV, Hep C, an STI
    Suffers from HIV, Hep C, an STI

    Do use

    Living with HIV, Hep C, an STI, [other diagnosis]
    Was diagnosed with an STI [or other condition]

    Don't use

    “AIDS” or “HIV/AIDS” when referring to HIV
    ex. It is important to get tested for AIDS
    ex. Died from HIV/AIDS

    Do use

    HIV
    ex. It is important to get tested for HIV
    ex. Died from AIDS-related complications; died from opportunisticinfections

    Don't use

    “They,” “them” or “those people”
    ex. When their immune system is weak
    ex. If they are taking Hep C medications

    Do use

    “We,” “our” or “those of us” – especially in peer contexts
    ex. When our immune system is weak
    ex. If we are taking Hep C medications; those of us who are taking HIV medications

    Don't use

    Protect
    ex. Protect against HIV

    Do use

    Prevent
    ex. Prevent HIV from being passed

    Don't use

    Sexually transmitted disease (STD)

    Do use

    Sexually transmitted infection (STI) - infection is more accurate and less stigmatizing

    Don't use

    “Healthy” when referring to people who are not living with HIV or Hep C
    ex. People living with HIV and Hep C can have healthy children

    Do use

    More specific language - people can be healthy whether or not we are living with HIV, Hep C, or other conditions
    ex. People living with HIV and Hep C can have children who are HIV/HCV negative

    Don't use

    Guys
    ex. Thanks guys for having YouthCO!

    Do use

    Folks, friends, guests – words that are not gendered
    ex. Folks, thanks so much for having YouthCO!

    Don't use

    Breastmilk
    Breastfeeding

    Do use

    Human milk
    Chest feeding, nursing

    Don't use

    Mother-to-child transmission
    ex. We are seeing fewer cases of HIV happen through mother-to-child transmission.

    Do use

    HIV passed at birth or through nursing – this phrasing makes assumptions about the gender of birth parents, and places blame/responsibility for transmission on the birth parent.
    ex. Some youth became HIV-positive at birth or through nursing.

    Don't use

    Clean/dirty used to describe equipment or people

    Do use

    To describe people – abstinent, not using/actively using To describe equipment (e.g. needles) – new, unused/used

    Don't use

    Gendered descriptions
    ex. Female condoms
    ex. Pap smears are an important part of health care for women

    Do use

    Body parts or actions
    ex. Insertive condoms
    ex. Pap smears are an important part of health care for people with a cervix

    Don't use

    Prostitution

    Do use

    Sex work

    Don't use

    Junkies, addicts, alcoholics, when used to describe other people

    Do use

    People who use drugs, people experiencing addiction, people with a substance use disorder (depending on what we’re talking about; note, most of us use drugs whether that be caffeine, nicotine, etc.)

    Don't use

    Homosexual; transsexual; identity-based slurs

    Do use

    Terms people use to self-identify
    ex. gay, lesbian, bisexual, trans, pansexual, etc.

    Don't use

    Judgments
    ex. slut, promiscuous, crazy, dirty, bad

    Do use

    Speak neutrally about activities
    ex. Having sex, using drugs

    Don't use

    Risk
    ex. Using drugs is a risk activity for Hep C
    ex. Risk activities for HIV include...
    ex. Youth are at-risk for Hep C

    Do use

    More specific language - “risk” is produced by inequities and systems of oppression, is often used as a label to exclude or stigmatize people, and portrays people as a source of virus or bacteria
    ex. Sharing needles can pass Hep C
    ex. Activities that can pass HIV include...
    ex. Youth may come into contact with Hep C

    Don't use

    Normal
    ex. Normal sex
    ex. A normal CD4 cell count is...

    Do use

    More specific language - “normal” can be othering and exclusive
    ex. Penis in vagina sex; sex where a mouth is on a bum, vulva, strapless
    ex. CD4 cell counts above 500 mean our immune system can fight off most infections

    Don't use

    Safe
    ex. This is a safe space.
    ex. This is one way to have safe sex / safely inject

    Do use

    Safer - “safe” is a subjective concept
    ex. We work together to make this a safer space.
    ex. Safer sex can look like conversations with partners, or letting friends know where we are.

    Don't use

    Treatment as Prevention (TasP)

    Do use

    More specific language such as treatment, ARVs, medication, undetectable viral load that centres people living with HIV rather than public health prevention narratives.

    Don't use

    “Newcomer” to describe someone who has lived in Canada for a long time

    Do use

    More specific language - Afro-Canadian Positive Network taught us that the word newcomer, used to refer to someone who has been in Canada a long time, can be othering

    Please share far and wide, with credit to YouthCO and the organizations who have shared their knowledge with us!

    Download a PDF of this report


    Other great language resources:

    Want us to list your inclusive language resource, or have feedback about our resource? Send it to us at info@youthco.org and we'll get in touch!

    YouthCO believes that all youth have the right to accessible and affirming information about our health. We also know each of us has a unique relationship to our bodies, sex, sexuality, substance use, and harm reduction. For many of us, the words other people use for our bodies and their functions are not the words we use for ourselves. Throughout our website, YouthCO uses words for bodies and sex that we know will not reflect the full diversity of our communities. We have tried to, where possible, be as expansive with our language as we know how to while being as specific as possible. As youth leading the HIV movement, we too are learning about the best words for our experiences and do not do this perfectly. We invite any feedback about the language used on our website, in our programs, and in our resources to help us move forward in the best ways for all youth in our communities!

  • published YouTube 2020-07-11 15:44:14 -0700