Whatever our status, let's resist stigma!

Whatever our HIV status or viral load, there are plenty of ways for us to resist the stigma around HIV. Together with Resist Stigma, we are proud to present these posters showing different ways that we can resist stigma, whatever our HIV status or viral load.

Earlier this year, people living with HIV came together to share conversations that we have all too often with people who are stuck with misinformation and myths about HIV. Each poster brings together information from our statement on undetectable = untransmissible, our values of anti-oppression and sex-positivity, and showcases choices we’re making as young people when it comes to sex. Today, we know a lot more about HIV than ever before, and these posters help to share this information and challenge stigma at the same time. The links below will take you to each poster and a brief explanation of the message we chose to include!

Whatever our HIV status:

are ways of resisting stigma. 

Each one of the four posters in this series emphasizes that whatever our HIV status, we can play a role in challenging stigma and strengthening our communities. One awesome way to do that is by making informed decisions about sex that are right for us, from medication for treatment or prevention, to condoms, lube, testing, and talking about our sexual health! Whatever our HIV status or viral load, stigma has no place in the way we interact with each other. What is one way that you will #resiststigma?


YouthCO's office is located on the unceded traditional territory of the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm, Sḵwx̱wú7mesh and Tsleil-Waututh people. Our programs take place on unceded, ancestral, and traditional territories of many Indigenous nations across what is now called BC.

YouthCO believes that all youth have the right to accessible and affirming information about our health. We also know each of us has a unique relationship to our bodies, sex, sexuality, substance use, and harm reduction. For many of us, the words other people use for our bodies and their functions are not the words we use for ourselves. Throughout our website, YouthCO uses words for bodies and sex that we know will not reflect the full diversity of our communities. We have tried to, where possible, be as expansive with our language as we know how to while being as specific as possible. As youth leading the HIV movement, we too are learning about the best words for our experiences and do not do this perfectly. We invite any feedback about the language used on our website to help us move forward in the best ways for all youth in our communities!