Love Positive Women

This event is located on the traditional territory of the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm, Sḵwx̱wú7mesh and Tsleil-Waututh.

YouthCO and Positive Women's Network are excited to present, Love Positive Women, a global holiday to surround positive women with gestures of love. 

This year's event will feature refreshments, an opportunity to make and receive valentines, crafty activities, and most importantly, community. All are welcome to join this event; kid-friendly activities will be available. Professional ASL interpretation will be provided during this event.

No RSVP is required.

LOVE POSITIVE WOMEN: Romance Starts at Home! (LPW) started in 2013. It is a holiday for women living with HIV that happens annually from February 1st - 14th. Using Valentine's Day as a backdrop, LPW creates a platform for individuals and communities to engage in public and private acts of love and caring for women living with HIV. Going beyond romantic love to deep community love and social justice, LPW is a call to action. It requires participants to reflect on how they as either a woman living with HIV or an ally will commit to loving women living with HIV and then do it. Through action, change can be made to fueling economies of love and compassion. Working from a place of strength, LPW focuses on the idea of interconnectedness, relationship building, loving oneself and loving ones community. By starting from a place of love, within oneself there are endless ways that the negative impacts that HIV has on women living with HIV can be lessened.

WHEN
February 10, 2016 at 4pm - 7pm
WHERE
YouthCO Office (205-568 Seymour St.)
CONTACT
Jessica Vielle · 604-688-1441
3 RSVPS
edith hole

Will you come?


YouthCO's office is located on the unceded traditional territory of the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm, Sḵwx̱wú7mesh and Tsleil-Waututh people. Our programs take place on unceded, ancestral, and traditional territories of many Indigenous nations across what is now called BC.

YouthCO believes that all youth have the right to accessible and affirming information about our health. We also know each of us has a unique relationship to our bodies, sex, sexuality, substance use, and harm reduction. For many of us, the words other people use for our bodies and their functions are not the words we use for ourselves. Throughout our website, YouthCO uses words for bodies and sex that we know will not reflect the full diversity of our communities. We have tried to, where possible, be as expansive with our language as we know how to while being as specific as possible. As youth leading the HIV movement, we too are learning about the best words for our experiences and do not do this perfectly. We invite any feedback about the language used on our website to help us move forward in the best ways for all youth in our communities!