Janna

Pronouns: she, her, hers.

Janna is a white settler living as an uninvited guest on this land. She grew up on Crawford Purchase land, nearby Treaty 57, in 'Ontario' and spent her adolescence as a queer, HCV+, street-involved youth, and drug user. She traveled for many years exploring the country, discovering music, and connecting with rural communities. These experiences led her to youth engagement programs and peer advocacy work. Quickly she fell in love with delivering workshops and deepened a passion for drug policy work and reducing stigmas enforced onto marginalized community members. As a woman of many interests Janna has worked as a birth doula, a sound engineer for live shows and film, a fisherman in northern 'Saskatchewan', a writer and life-skills coach, is slowly pursuing (through scholarships/bursaries) a bachelors degree in psychology, a certificate in animal behaviour, and is passionate in the field of mental health. Her favorite TV show (at the moment) is The Office and it should be noted that she is quite comfortable embarking on very long one-sided conversations with any dog willing to listen. Janna can be reached at janna@youthco.org.

 


YouthCO's office is located on the unceded traditional territory of the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm, Sḵwx̱wú7mesh and Tsleil-Waututh people. Our programs take place on unceded, ancestral, and traditional territories of many Indigenous nations across what is now called BC.

YouthCO believes that all youth have the right to accessible and affirming information about our health. We also know each of us has a unique relationship to our bodies, sex, sexuality, substance use, and harm reduction. For many of us, the words other people use for our bodies and their functions are not the words we use for ourselves. Throughout our website, YouthCO uses words for bodies and sex that we know will not reflect the full diversity of our communities. We have tried to, where possible, be as expansive with our language as we know how to while being as specific as possible. As youth leading the HIV movement, we too are learning about the best words for our experiences and do not do this perfectly. We invite any feedback about the language used on our website to help us move forward in the best ways for all youth in our communities!