I've been diagnosed with Hep C

A:

Finding out we have Hep C can feel scary or overwhelming. At YouthCO, we offer peer support for young people living with HIV or Hep C. You can get in touch with us by calling 604-688-1441, or through our Facebook page!

With any new health condition, getting the facts we need can help make it less scary. Check out our Resource page for community resources, websites, and more information, including a peer support phone line, Help4HepBC, which we can reach at 1 888 411 7578. The phone call, support and information are all provided free of charge.

If you’ve just been diagnosed, there are some important things to know:

Hep C is not a terminal illness

One really important thing to remember is that Hep C is a chronic illness, which means it’s something that we will have for a long time. For about 25% of people with Hep C, the virus will go away on its own.  By taking care of our livers and health, we can live long healthy lives with Hep C. 

There is treatment for Hep C

Treatment for Hep C is the best it has ever been! A health care worker can help us decide what treatment is best for us and how to get started.

There is support

Vancouver, BC, and Canada have programs, support for people living with Hep C.  Accessing support groups, peer navigators, recreational programs, and social services can improve our health and help us live well with Hep C. Check out our community resources page for more information.


YouthCO's office is located on the unceded traditional territory of the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm, Sḵwx̱wú7mesh and Tsleil-Waututh people. Our programs take place on unceded, ancestral, and traditional territories of many Indigenous nations across what is now called BC.

YouthCO believes that all youth have the right to accessible and affirming information about our health. We also know each of us has a unique relationship to our bodies, sex, sexuality, substance use, and harm reduction. For many of us, the words other people use for our bodies and their functions are not the words we use for ourselves. Throughout our website, YouthCO uses words for bodies and sex that we know will not reflect the full diversity of our communities. We have tried to, where possible, be as expansive with our language as we know how to while being as specific as possible. As youth leading the HIV movement, we too are learning about the best words for our experiences and do not do this perfectly. We invite any feedback about the language used on our website to help us move forward in the best ways for all youth in our communities!